Native Americans Originally Settled Homes of Michael Quinn Kaiser

A California native, Michael Quinn Kaiser began life in Ventura, California. Located along the original pathway connecting the first historic California missions, El Camino Real, Ventura now knows that route as U.S.

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A California native, Michael Quinn Kaiser began life in Ventura, California.  Located along the original pathway connecting the first historic California missions, El Camino Real, Ventura now knows that route as U.S. Route 101, or the Ventura Freeway, connecting Los Angeles and Santa Barbara.  This region of California has deep roots with the Native American Chumash.  The village encountered by Friar Juan Crespi on the Portola expedition of 1769 is estimated to have been built around 1000AD.  Junipero Serra’s final mission to be established was Mission San Buenaventura, which lent its name to today’s metropolitan district and has been rebuilt several times to be used today as a parish church.  Quinn did not grow up in his birth city, as he and his parents soon relocated upstate.

Michael Quinn Kaiser grew up in Hercules, California, 364 miles north of his birth city of Ventura.  Hercules is on Contra Costa County, the region of which was first occupied by the Bay Miwok and Huichin Ohlone Native Americans, although they did not reside in any village on the original site of Hercules.  The town was established on land which had been a part of the Pinole y Canada del Hambre grant to Ygnacio Martinez in 1823.

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventura,_California

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hercules,_California